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Endell Street Military Hospital Digital Collection

  • UKLSE-DL1ES01
  • Collection
  • 1915 -1919

This collection contains the part of the archives of Louisa Garrett Anderson (7LGA) and of Nina Last (7NLA) relating to Endell Street Military Hospital.
In August 1914, Louisa Garrett Anderson and Flora Murray founded the Women’s Hospital Corps under the auspices of the French Red Cross. Louisa was chief surgeon. They established a hospital in the Hotel Claridge in Paris which ran from September 1914 to January 1915. In November 1914 they were asked to open a second hospital at Wimereux under the Royal Army Medicine Corps (RAMC), which ran until early 1915. They were then offered hospital premised in London, so closed both hospitals in France and returned to England. The Endell Street Military Hospital, the first hospital in the UK established expressly for men by women, ran from May 1915 until December 1919 and treated over 26,000 patients, 24,000 of them male.

This collection contains:

  • letters regarding the Women’s Hospital Corps from Louisa Garrett Anderson to her family (mainly to her mother, Elizabeth Garrett Anderson);
  • a notebook by orderly Nina Last covering her work at Endell Street Military Hospital;
  • scrapbook relating to Endell Street Military Hospital compiled by Flora Murray for 1916;
  • photographs of the hospitals and image of an embroidered shoe bag.

Inter-war Feminist Pamphlet Collection

  • UKLSE-DL1IF01
  • Collection
  • 1918-1940

This set of pamphlets are drawn from The Women’s Library and related collections at LSE Library and they document women’s rights and their engagement in politics and public life from 1918-1940. These titles evidence the ideas and activities of women’s organisations, individual campaigners, reformers and women in public life. Also included are perspectives of politicians, governments, and intergovernmental organisations, as they responded (or failed to respond) to issues raised by advocates of women’s equality and rights.
The digitisation of these pamphlets was undertaken in partnership with Jisc in 2019 as part of the Digitising Social Movements of the 20th Century project: https://www.jisc.ac.uk/rd/projects/digitising-20th-century-social-movements

Women's International League for Peace and Freedom, British Section (WILPF)

  • UKLSE-AS1WF01
  • Collection
  • 2013-2015

The collection includes the born-digital records of the Women's International League for Peace and Freedom, British Section (WILPF).

The first series of records consists of oral histories recorded as part of a project called 'These Dangerous Women', to mark the 100th anniversary of WILPF.

WILPF was formed in 1915, when a group of women met for an International Women's Congress in The Hague, Holland, when most of Europe was engaged in the First World War. The organisers of the Congress were prominent women in the International Suffrage Alliance from both belligerent and neutral countries. Despite the difficulties of travel during war time approximately 1200 women from 12 countries attended the congress. Several women were also prevented from attending, including 180 British women whom the British government either denied a passport to or prevented from attending by closing the North Sea to shipping. The congress acted as a protest against World War I and the women discussed the principles on which the war could be stopped and a permanent peace constructed. The Congress established an International Committee of Women for Permanent Peace, which four years later became the Women's International League for Peace and Freedom.

Following the end of the war WILPF held their second International Congress in Zurich, Switzerland in 1919 (with several members of the British section attending) and shortly afterwards WILPF established an office in Geneva, Switzerland which would be the organisation's headquarters. They have since then regularly held International Congresses roughly every three years. During the 1920s and 1930s WILPF campaigned heavily for peace and disarmament, organising peace marches in Great Britain in 1926 and collecting signatures for a world disarmament petition in the early 1930s. On the outbreak of the Second World War in 1939 communication between the different sections across the world proved difficult, part of the WILPF office moved to New York, USA with the remainder staying in Geneva. The British section remained active throughout the war.

The post war campaigning activities of WILPF have largely been concerned with nuclear disarmament, social and economic justice and the protection of individual human rights. The British section were active in Greenham Common and supported the anti - apartheid campaign in South Africa. WILPF continues to be active today, although many sections across the world are struggling with falling membership figures and financial difficulties. There are currently sections in 32 countries and WILPF is recognised as an NGO.

Women's Resource Centre

  • UKLSE-AS1SD01
  • Collection
  • 2019-2020

This collection includes the born-digital records of the The Women's Resource centre (WRC).

WRC is the UK leading umbrella body for the women’s sector. Its membership and networks include predominantly small local specialist women’s organisations.

WRC was established in 1984, originally as a network of teaching professionals to promote anti-sexist, anti-racist teaching materials in the educational curriculum and eventually evolved in to a women's centre. In response to consultation with organisations in the women’s voluntary and community sector (WVCS) in the late 1990s, WRC took on its current role as an umbrella body providing capacity building and support for women’s organisations, and registered as a charity in 1998.

WRC takes its position from the historical context of the Women’s Liberation Movement.

For more information, explore the WRC website and its history page.